Daily Reviews for July 18

MSI GeForce GTX 680 Lightning Video Card @ Benchmark Reviews

NVIDIA's new Kepler-based video cards have set new standards in performance for the desktop graphics market. Now that reference-design cards are widely available, manufacturers have the breathing space to start distinguishing their products. Benchmark Reviews has been given the opportunity to examine MSI's N680GTX Lightning video card, and as we'll see MSI has gone far beyond simply slapping a new cooler on a reference design board. As with other products in MSI's Lightning line, the N680GTX boasts a completely new board design that should allow substantial overclocking.

G.Skill TridentX 2666C11-13-13-35 Kit Review @ Madshrimps

The G.Skill brand has become one of the more popular brands in the enthusiast community. This Taiwanese RAM company has won the hearts of many overclockers, especially due their binning methods and affordable price tag. Therefore G.Skill manages time after time to launch RAM kits in multiple speed/timing versions, in different quantities and best of all they usually sport some extra overclocking headroom. With each new CPU platform that pops up, G.Skill introduces simultaneously a new series of RAM. When Intel launched Ivy Bridge, the TridentX RAM series popped up on the G.Skill website. The RAM vendors had to redo their binning methods, mainly due to the high ram speed support of the new Ivy Bridge CPU's. Enthusiast RAM isn't solely based anymore on just tight timings, high RAM speeds is one of the new requirements. The TridentX kit reviewed today is one of the higher specced kits, supporting a whopping 2666Mhz at CAS 11-13-13-35 2T timings out of the box.

IN WIN GreenMe 650W Power Supply Review @ Legit Reviews

The IN WIN 80 PLUS BRONZE Certified GreenMe series is a high performance power supply series that is said deliver quality and efficiency at an affordable price. The In Win GreenMe 650W has four +12V rails that are each rated at 25 Amps and a single 120mm double ball-bearing fan to keep everything cool. Read on to see how this sub $70 power supply does on our test bench!

Thermaltake Frio Advanced Heatsink Review @ Frostytech.com

Thermaltake's Frio Advanced heatsink stands 161mm tall and weighs upwards of 954 grams, it is rated to heat loads of 230 Watts by the manufacturer. The heatsink ships with two 130mm PWM fans arranged in a push-pull configuration that rotate at 2000-800RPM. Behind each fan shroud is a 110mm tall aluminum fin tower connected by five U-shaped, 6mm diameter copper heatpipes which are exposed at the base. Thermaltake's Frio Advanced heatsink is compatible with Intel socket LGA2011/1366/1155/1156/775 and AMD socket AM2/AM3/FM1 CPUs.

Cooler Master Elite 120 Advanced mini ITX Case @ Pro-Clockers

The new case is the Elite 120 Advanced which is a total different animal than the Elite 100. The Elite 100 is more like a vertical HTPC enclosure while the 120 Advanced is a more squared true SFF case. Yes, they are aimed at two different users. The gamer will without a doubt opt for the Elite 120 Advanced as it can hold a full-sized GPU, even two and a standard configuration power supply. We are going to take the Elite 120 Advanced for a spin and see how we like it and see if we will recommend it to the masses.

be quiet! Dark Power Pro 10 850 W Power Supply Review @ Hardware Secrets

The German brand be quiet! released last month a new high-end power supply series, the Dark Power Pro 10, with models ranging from 550 W to 1,200 W. The 850 W model has the coveted 80 Plus Platinum certification, while all other models have the 80 Plus Gold certification. Let's test the 850 W version and see if it is a good pick.

RaidSonic ICY BOX IB-PL550D 500Mbit/s Powerline Adapter Kit Review @ NikKTech

Most people i know connect all of their computers with their modem/router wirelessly mainly because they don't like having many cables around and quite honestly who can blame them. I on the other hand use Wi-Fi on very rare occasions and only when I’m neither at my office or at home. The reasons behind is that i don't like people using my wireless connection without authorization (there are plenty of hacks out there that enable one to use your Wi-Fi even if you have password protected it) and also because i want to enjoy the highest possible transfer speeds. So i have chosen the best possible solution by routing Ethernet CAT5 cables throughout the walls of both my home and office something which may however not be easy for most people. For those who can't do something like that and don't really trust or like the speed of their wireless connection current Powerline adapters could be the solution and today we are testing the latest ICY BOX IB-PL550D 500Mbit/s Powerline adapter kit.